Extending the gable

By - , Build 131

Another common feature of many leaky buildings that can be worth changing is the flush gable or the roof gable hidden behind a parapet.

Figure 1: Gable roof extension for metal tile roofing and outriggers.

It’s relatively simple during a remediation project where the building is being reclad to create a gable that provides some overhang to the wall, increasing the protection to that surface. The amount of protection will be influenced by the width of the new overhang, the height of the wall and the typical wind speeds.

For pitched roofs, outriggers can be supported on the top of the gable-wall end framing and extend back to the next truss or to a rafter.

Where the overhang created is more than 450 mm and the roof is constructed with rafters, the outrigger may need to extend back at least 900 mm. This may require removal of a second rafter.

As with the eaves extension detail on pages 23–24, any parapet must be removed and damaged wall framing replaced and the additional roof cladding must be integrated with the existing roof cladding:

  • For tiles (see Figure 1), this will mean lifting existing tiles back to the next end joint to allow the installation of the new.
  • For long-run profiled metal, the new roofing can be side lapped over the existing.
Figure 1: Gable roof extension for metal tile roofing and outriggers.

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Figure 1: Gable roof extension for metal tile roofing and outriggers.

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